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1.

Private Sector Foundation Uganda

Competitiveness And Enterprise Development Project

  • 100 Million
  • Uganda
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Competitiveness And Enterprise Development Project
Company Name Private Sector Foundation Uganda
Country Uganda , Eastern Africa
Project Value 100 Million
Project Detail

Project Development Objective 32. The original PDO of the parent project, CEDP (P130471) is to improve the competitiveness of enterprises in Uganda by providing support for: (i) the implementation of business environment reforms, including the land administration reform and (ii) the development of priority productive and service sectors. 33. Under the AF, the PDO will be changed as follows: to support measures that faciliate increased private sector investment in the tourism sector and strengthen effectiveness of the land administration system. The revised PDO is more specific and focused on outcomes that are directly attributable to the project and will allow for better evaluation. 34. PDO indicators in the results framework are the following: (a) Reduction in number of days to register land from 52 days to 25 days. (b) Reduction in number of days to register a business from 33 days to 5 days and Cost to register a business (as % of income per capita) from 76.70 percent to 50 percent. (c) Increased International Tourist Arrival from 945,000 to 1,500,000. (d) Increased Tourism Sector Employmnet from 225,300 to 300,000. (e) Increase in exports of non-traditional products by 10%. (f) Direct job beneficiaries up to 1,000,000 people. (g) Increased/additional private investment in tourism by US$10 million (h) Strengthen effectiveness of land administration system, measured by · 21 Ministry zonal offices made the NLIS compliant and operationalized and · New land titles including 200,000 new land titles issued to women individually or jointly. 35. The Theory of Change (Annex 1) in the project centers around measures that facilitate an increase in private sector investment in tourism and strengthen effectiveness of the land administration system. The activities of the two components, consolidation of the land administration system and tourism product and competitiveness development are shown in Annex 1 as well as outputs and outcomes. The project will identify new investment areas in tourism where the private sector will invest. It will also provide new land titles to people thereby securing their land rights Scope of Additional Financing 36. The AF will use an Investment Project Financing (IPF) with DLIs approach. Building on the project’s experience of managing the implementation of inputs, the AF proposes to use IPF-DLIs to encourage the implementing partners to focus on performance and sustainability and increase disbursement at the beginning of project implementation. For the tourism component this relates to seeking sustainable private sector partnerships and private investment, and for the land component the focus is on increasing access for households across Uganda. The shift will also motivate the key private and public stakeholders to work toward implementing complementary policy and regulatory shifts that go beyond the scope of the project activities. Uganda has recently used and implemented DLIs in the Uganda Support to Municipal Infrastructure Development Program (P117876), a Program-for-Results operation; the Uganda Teachers and Schools Effectiveness Project (P133780); and the African Centers of Excellence Project II (P151847). The other two components in the parent project, business registration and business licensing and the matching grant facility, have been completed and are not expected to be supported under the AF. 37. Component 1: Land Administration Reform (US$53.7 million equivalent of which US$22 million equivalent is DLIs). The AF proposes to further strengthen the land administration system in Uganda through a combination of: (a) systems’ improvements and physical infrastructure; (b) systematic registration of communal and individually owned land; (c) enhancements in land valuations capacity; and (d) strengthening of institutional and dispute resolution capacity and human capital. While the land agenda in Uganda is broader than the particular focus in this project, the activities included in and results incentivized through the use of DLIs are key foundational elements needed to advance the economic benefits of land administration. 38. Subcomponent 1.1: Improving and Consolidating Land Administration Infrastructure and System (US$16.2 million). The completion of MZOs and their integration with the NLIS will deepen utilization at the national and local levels. It will also lay the groundwork for systematic land registration through strengthening the Survey and Mapping Department, the consolidation of spatial data infrastructure (SDI), and the establishment of a multipurpose cadaster. Developing a policy and legal framework for land-related housing, urban development and designing programs for implementation. Implementation of the gender strategy to ensure that women’s access to land, including joint titling, is key. Out of the 500,000 new titles to be issued, 200,000 titles will be for women. 39. Subcomponent 1.2: Systematic Registration of Communal and Individually Owned Land (US$25.5 million). The project will undertake national-level systematic land registration to record land rights including the issuance of Communal Land Associations (CLAs), Certificate of Customary Ownership (CCO), and all legal documents, including titles, and ultimately register titles in the NLIS. The systematic registration will work on all land tenure systems existing in the country. 40. Subcomponent 1.3: Strengthening the Ministry of Lands on Land Valuation, Land Acquisition, Property Taxation and the development and implementation of the Land Valuation Management Information System (LAVMIS) (US$7 million). Standardization of implementation standards, mass sensitization on valuation and land acquisition, including potential impact of climate change and capacity building of staff on data collection will be undertaken to enhance the capacity of the ministry staff and enable evidence-based decision making in the sector.

Sector Administration & Marketing

Contact Details

Company Name Private Sector Foundation Uganda
Address Team Leader Moses K. Kibirige, Mary Lisbeth Gonzalez
Web Site https://projects.worldbank.org/en/projects-operations/project-detail/P169435

2.

School Education Department, Government of Punjab

Punjab Human Capital Investment Project

  • 330 Million
  • Pakistan
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Punjab Human Capital Investment Project
Company Name School Education Department, Government of Punjab
Country Pakistan , Southern Asia
Project Value 330 Million
Project Detail

Project Development Objective PDO Statement 13. The proposed project development objective (PDO) is to increase the utilization of quality health services, and economic and social inclusion programs, among poor and vulnerable households in select districts in Punjab. PDO-Level Indicators • PDO Indicator 1: Percent of pregnant women, among Conditional Cash Transfer (CCT) 13 beneficiaries, who delivered a child attended by skilled health personnel • PDO Indicator 2: Percent of children between the ages of 12 and 23 months, among CCT beneficiaries, fully immunized as per the age specific protocol. o Percent disaggregated by gender • PDO Indicator 3: Percent of beneficiaries who reported an overall income increase due to asset support. o Percent disaggregated by gender. • PDO Indicator 4: Percent of children who transition from preschool to Grade 1 B. Project Components 14. The financial instrument for this Project will be Investment Project Financing (IPF). Key principles of the Project are as follows: • Poverty targeting: For objective targeting based on the household poverty status, the NSER will be used.14 • Geographic targeting of most vulnerable districts: Initially, 11 out of 36 districts in Punjab will be prioritized. Among the 11 districts, 8 districts are from South Punjab, where poor households are concentrated.15 The number of districts covered by the Project depends on the scope and cost of planned activities, as well as available resources. • Integrated, but selective: Interventions will be integrated (addressing both demand and supply challenges) in the same set of locations within the same households, multisectoral (health, education, SP) and selective (complementing existing programs). • Gender-focused: The Project will: (i) address gender gaps in immunization and school enrollment for early education; (ii) promote ante-natal care (ANC) and skilled birth attendance; and (iii) address specific constraints faced by women in income-generating activities and diversification of income sources. Component 1: Health services quality and utilization (approximately US$115 million equivalent) 15. The component will improve maternal and new-born health, especially among poor and vulnerable households. This will enable a strong start in a child’s first 1,000 days. Sub-component 1.1: Quality of health services (approximately US$45 million equivalent) 16. This sub-component will include: a) Strengthening the primary health-care facilities in the provision of good quality services and their adherence to Minimum Service Delivery Standards (MSDS) by: (i) upgrading of selected basic health units (BHUs) in selected districts to provide uninterrupted (24/7) services all days of the week, including provision of essential equipment, medicines and supplies; and (ii) upgrading of selected rural health centers (RHCs) in the selected districts to provide neonatal intensive care on a pilot basis; (b) hiring/recruiting and/or training healthcare personnel, including pediatricians, medical officers, lady health workers (LHWs) and lady health visitors; (c) providing nutrition services through outdoor therapeutic program (OTP) counters; (d) providing population welfare services in close coordination with the department responsible for population welfare; and (e) upgrading and scaling-up the electronic medical records system (EMR) for, and implementing the Environmental and Health Care Waste Management Plan (EHCWMP) in, health facilities in the selected districts. 17. Facilities rehabilitated under the Project will include measures to facilitate access for persons with different abilities; have improved resilience to climate shocks such as floods or extremely high temperatures; and improved energy efficiency with rooftop solar power, where possible. Considering climate risks in targeted districts, medicines including vaccinations would be strategically stockpiled in selected health facilities, particularly prior to the annual monsoon season. Sub-component 1.2: Utilization of health services (approximately US$70 million equivalent) 18. This sub-component will increase the utilization of key health services among poor and vulnerable households, as identified through the NSER, in the select districts, through: (a) implementing a CCT program and providing Conditional Cash Grants (CCGs) to eligible pregnant or lactating women and/or parents of children up to 2 years of age (eligible CCG Beneficiaries); and (b) carrying out outreach, social mobilization and information dissemination campaigns among health service beneficiaries. 19. CCT co-responsibilities (conditionalities) include: regular health checkups of PLW, skilled birth delivery and birth registration, growth promotion, immunization of children under two years of age and participation in counseling and awareness sessions on population welfare, hygiene, feeding and caring practices, children’s cognitive development, as well as food security and healthy foods for nutrition (See Annex 3 for a detailed description of co-responsibilities). The Project Operational Manual (POM) contains a section on the CCT describing operational procedures and implementation arrangements. It was prepared jointly by the PSPA and the Primary and Secondary Healthcare Department (PSHD). The service delivery process will include beneficiary outreach through information campaigns, social mobilization and LHWs16. Service delivery will be mainly at primary and secondary healthcare facilities. Upon verification of compliance with co-responsibilities, transfers will be made digitally to the individuals’ bank accounts.17 Business processes related to the program will be supported by the service delivery platform described in Component 3. The amount of transfers would be greater for services critical to child health and nutrition, and for which the take-up has been low. Based on the number of Benazir Income Support Programme (BISP) beneficiary women; and assumptions regarding the likelihood of pregnancy, conditionality schedules, and coverage of children up to the age of two, the Project financing of approximately US$65 million would be used for cash benefits to (up to one million beneficiaries) beneficiaries, and the remaining US$5 million would be used for social mobilization and empowerment support by PSPA. Component 2: Economic and social inclusion (approximately US$65 million equivalent) 20. This component comprises supplementary activities to improve households’ economic and social inclusion. It will be introduced and are expected to contribute to building early childhood human capital among povertystricken households. Sub-component 2.1: Economic inclusion (approximately US$35 million equivalent) 21. This sub-component will promote the economic inclusion of poor and vulnerable eligible young parents18 through the provision of technical assistance, goods and training, including and not limited to provide: (a) labor market readiness (LMR) training; (b) Livelihood Support Grants (LSGs) or the Productive Assets; and (c) intensive coaching aimed at improving productive behavior to help increase resilience of households of the eligible young parents. 22. The POM sets out the requirements for participation. Prior to receiving a productive asset, individuals from target households will participate in the LMR component, which will include training on basic literacy and numeracy to equip participants with record-keeping skills for managing a livelihood; social and health awareness; and confidence-building. Market analysis and beneficiary profiling exercises will be conducted during LMR delivery, to recommend a list of livelihood packages that are viable for the targeted poor, considering participant skillsets, interest, care burden, resources as well as the environment, particularly climate risks and the associated need for income diversification. The completion of the LMR package is expected to pave way for technical skills development (e.g., animal husbandry, entrepreneurship, financial literacy). Livelihood support, including the transfer of productive assets (e.g. livestock, tools, merchandise, material on climate-smart agriculture etc.), will then be accompanied by bimonthly coaching services. The entire series of activities will be directly delivered or informed by community organizations that have local presence, supervised and monitored by the PSPA. The Project financing would be used to procure community organizations’ service delivery.

Sector Administration & Marketing

Contact Details

Company Name School Education Department, Government of Punjab
Address Team Leader Yoonyoung Cho, Shahram Paksima, Sohail Saeed Abbasi
Web Site https://projects.worldbank.org/en/projects-operations/project-detail/P164785

3.

Jingyang Project Management Office

Sichuan Water Supply and Sanitation PPP Project

  • 154 Million
  • China
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Sichuan Water Supply and Sanitation PPP Project
Company Name Jingyang Project Management Office
Country China , Eastern Asia
Project Value 154 Million
Project Detail

Project Development Objective PDO Statement 31. The objectives of the project are to improve access to water supply and sanitation services and improve the quality and efficiency of water supply and sanitation service delivery in select peri-urban and rural areas of Jingyang District of Deyang City in Sichuan Province. PDO Level Indicators24 32. The following five Project Development Objective (PDO) level results indicators reflect the specific outcomes that the project is aiming to achieve: (a) Number of people benefiting from improved water supply services (b) Number of people benefiting from safely managed sanitation services25, 26 (c) Percentage of customers satisfied with the services provided by the Project Company25 (d) Reduction in Non-Revenue Water Rate (NRW) (percentage of NRW in total water produced) (e) Cost recovery in water supply services C. Project Components 33. The project has two components: Component 1: Institutional Strengthening and Infrastructure Investments to Improve WSS Services in Jingyang District (Estimated cost: US$153.4 million; IBRD loan: US$99 million) (Water: 34 percent, wastewater: 66 percent) 34. This component has three key activity areas: (a) Establishment of a modern, integrated WSS utility. The project will support the establishment of the WSS utility and systems to enable efficient WSS service delivery. Establishing the utility includes preparing and executing the PPP transaction as well as setting up and developing the institutional systems (for example, management, personnel, administration, and billing and accounting). Project support will also include developing an integrated smart water management platform and installing smart meters to enable the Project Company to monitor, manage, and operate WSS system assets efficiently. Establishing a financially sustainable, efficiently managed, and well-maintained WSS utility will lead to a reduction in NRW and more reliable water and sanitation services with less service interruptions and more consistent water quality. The investments will enhance water security and reduce the discharge of untreated wastewater into the tributaries of the Yangtze River (an important source of water), thereby increasing the reliability and quality of the water and making the residents in the targeted areas more resilient to climate change-exacerbated water shortages. (b) Establishment of WSS utility customer service mechanisms. The project will support the WSS utility to set up and conduct ongoing citizen engagement activities, including a community-based customer satisfaction survey, community meetings on WSS service quality, and WASH BCCs. The project will also support establishment of customer feedback mechanisms within the WSS utility, including a customer call center and a smartphone application to address complaints, questions, requests for repairs, and general feedback on the services provided. All of the citizen engagement activities and customer feedback mechanisms will be overseen and managed by a customer relations officer designated within the Project Company and in coordination with a social focal point within the Project Management Office (PMO) (see section III). (c) Support for engineering works. The project will support engineering works for both water supply and sanitation, as listed below. All investments under the project will be implemented and operated by the Project Company, providing the JDG with a single interface and contracting party, rather than the many contractors and operators. (i) For improved access to higher quality and more efficient piped water systems. The project will support consolidation and upgrading of the current 40 treatment facilities operated by different providers (of which 32 utilize groundwater as source, 7 utilize surface water, and 1 utilizes a nearby urban water treatment plant [WTP] as source) to a more integrated configuration using two centralized surface WTPs27—one newly constructed (Bailong WTP, with capacity of 25,000 m3 per day) and one expanded (Xinliu WTP, with capacity of 2,000 m3 per day)—operated by a single service provider. The above activities will lead to a more efficiently operated utility and an increased supply of good quality water. The project will also support protection of drinking water source sites and water intakes/wells, construction and rehabilitation of pipe networks to expand the network and reduce losses/NRW (including 148 km of transmission main, 347 km of distribution pipes, and 459 km of household connection pipes), and installation of 86,000 smart meters. All these investments will increase the supply of water and the service reliability, thus increasing community resilience to potential climate change-related droughts. The project will also fully finance the costs of household water supply connections, targeting to cover 94 percent of households. (ii) For improved access to higher quality and more efficient sanitation. The project will support upgrading four existing WWTPs28 with a total capacity of 12,400 m3 per day and construction of 10 new WWTPs29 with total capacity of 335 m3 per day. The project will support construction of 93 km of trunk sewer pipes, 788 km of branch network sewer pipes, 1,063 km of household service pipes, and 51 wastewater pump stations (42 new and 9 existing septic collection tanks converted into pump stations). In hilly areas, the project will support construction of individual household septic tanks to serve 6,712 scattered households. The project will fully finance the costs of household sewer service connections and septic tanks, for a total of 60,086 households. All these activities will reduce the volume of untreated wastewater discharged into water bodies, reducing pollution and lowering health risks to the population, as well as lowering the cost of treating the wastewater to given standards. (iii) Other works. There will also be improvements to public facilities, including providing access to services for the disabled. Recent projects in China have also demonstrated that making small investments in community public areas to enhance residents’ experience creates an environment where households are more willing to connect. The Feasibility Study Report (FSR) design includes some small investments for rehabilitation, ‘greening’, and beautification of public areas. Component 2: Institutional Capacity Building and Technical Assistance (TA) for PPP Oversight, Project Management, and Scale Up of the PPP Approach (Estimated cost: US$1.0 million; IBRD loan: US$1.0 million). 35. This component has four key activity areas: (a) Engagement of a project manager/independent engineer. The project will support the hiring of an independent engineer (consultant) to oversee the performance of the PPP Agreement, to supervise infrastructure construction, and to supervise the environmental and social management of the project. The independent engineer will also be responsible for verifying the KPI results and the energy and water efficiency gains reported by the Project Company against the targets in the PPP Agreement. (b) Local government capacity building for PPP oversight and project management. The public counterpart (especially HUDB and the PMO) will have key functions that are not delegated to the Project Company, including implementation of WSS policy and regulations, regulatory oversight of the Project Company, business planning, tariff setting, long-term asset management, and WSS system planning. The project will include capacity-building activities to support HUDB and the PMO carry out these functions, such as project management and PPP oversight training, technical training, FM, and PPP procurement training, as well as study tours of successful water sector PPP projects in China and abroad. Project management and implementation support will include management of and coordination with the independent engineer; establishment and operation of a monitoring and evaluation (M&E) system; monitoring of Project Company KPI and efficiency performance; and acquisition of office equipment, vehicles, and other operating resources (c) Coordination of gender inclusion and citizen engagement (GI&CE) activities. The project will support the PMO to supervise and monitor the GI&CE activities and customer feedback mechanisms executed by the Project Company (described in Subcomponent 1b). The PMO will designate a social focal point to coordinate closely with the Project Company on the communitybased satisfaction survey, the community meetings, and the operations of the customer call center and smartphone application (see the institutional arrangements discussion in section III). (d) Documentation and sharing of project experience (including lessons learned and PPP project templates). The project will support TA activities to identify mechanisms for scaling up the PPP approach developed under this project to other areas across Sichuan and China. In particular, the project’s overall lessons in institutional strengthening and structuring the PPP will be highly relevant to upstream PPP policies in China, including the implementation and investment decisions under the ongoing Sichuan Province Three-Year Action Plan (see section I). Specific TA activities include (i) preparing a summary report on experiences and lessons learned in PPP project preparation and procurement, (ii) preparation of PPP template documents to be used in the scale-up and replication of the project approach (for example, model contracts, bidding documents, and project management tools), and (iii) dissemination events/publications at the provincial/national level. Readiness of PPP Transaction 36. The project has been prepared to meet domestic requirements as well as taking international good practice into account. It is anticipated that: (a) requests for proposals for the PPP will be issued to qualified bidders in June 2020. The request for proposals will be only sent to pre-qualified firms that can demonstrate that they meet the technical and financial requirements to deliver the required services. To pre-qualify, companies would have to submit information on their ownership, qualifications, experience, and financial statements, allowing for a transparent process to assess the eligibility of a company to be pre-qualified; b) the private sector partner will be selected by October 2020, and (c) the PPP will reach financial close by December 2020 and that construction will commence soon thereafter. The construction (Phase 1) is expected to be completed by the end of 2024; the PPP will then step into Phase 2 (O&M) from the beginning of 2025. The PPP procurement documents and procurement processes will be subject to World Bank Operations Procurement Review Committee30 (OPRC) review and no objection.

Sector Administration & Marketing

Contact Details

Company Name Jingyang Project Management Office
Address Team Leader Gang Qin, Victoria Hilda Rigby Delmon
Web Site https://projects.worldbank.org/en/projects-operations/project-detail/P168025

4.

Planning and Development Department, Government of Balochistan

Balochistan Livelihoods and Entrepreneurship Project

  • 50 Million
  • Pakistan
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Balochistan Livelihoods and Entrepreneurship Project
Company Name Planning and Development Department, Government of Balochistan
Country Pakistan , Southern Asia
Project Value 50 Million
Project Detail

PROJECT DESCRIPTION 15. The Project is a US$50 million Investment Project Financing from the RSW and Pakistan’s core IDA allocation. The Project will also be co-financed by a US$15 million grant from the Multi Donor Trust Fund for Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, FATA and Balochistan. A. Project Development Objective PDO Statement 16. The Project Development Objective is to create employment opportunities for rural communities and achieve sustainability of enterprises in selected districts of Balochistan. PDO Level Indicators · PDO Indicator 1: Total Number of direct beneficiaries (disaggregated by relevant demographics including men, women, refugees and other vulnerable groups) (Corporate Results Indicator) · PDO Indicator 2: Beneficiaries of job-focused interventions, disaggregated by relevant demographics (Corporate Results Indicator) · PDO Indicator 3: Profitability of enterprises supported by the Project enhanced, disaggregated by gender · PDO Indicator 4: Percentage of enterprises supported through projects with ongoing operations after three years, disaggregated by gender Project Components 17. The Project has the following four components. Component 1: Economic Mobilization (US$6.59 million) 18. This component will support communities in rural and peri-urban areas of the selected districts by addressing the key constraints arising from the low population density and high cost of delivery in these far-flung areas. The Project will: i) mobilize technical and financial resources at the local level in a collective and transparent manner; and, ii) build capacity of existing and potential entrepreneurs to better manage and utilize local resources and savings for productive purposes. There are two sub-components. 19. Sub-component 1.1 – Community Facilitation will engage and develop a cadre of Local Facilitators (LFs) and Technical Resources Persons (TRPs)/specialists in selected districts of Balochistan to i) mobilize communities to form (organize and establish), revitalize and/or reactivate community-based groups through self-selection, attend group meetings and provide training; ii) screen and identify Enterprise Clusters (ECs), opportunity entrepreneurs and necessity entrepreneurs8 and assist them with the preparation of Enterprise Development Plans (EDPs) or Livelihoods Investment Plans (LIPs); iii) leverage community-based groups and their savings for the financing of EDPs and LIPs of eligible ECs and/or entrepreneurs; and, iv) assist Project Management and Implementation Unit (PMIU) in monitoring the Project’s performance. This sub-component will also strengthen fiduciary capacity of office bearers, community groups, LFs, ECs and entrepreneurs. LFs may include refugees while TRPs will be hired from the host community since they will be requiring greater skills, which refugees will likely not possess. 20. Sub-component 1.2 – Citizens’ Engagement will develop and roll out a Citizens’ Engagement Strategy comprised of training modules and annual perception surveys aimed at: i) changing citizens’ perceptions on state’s role in the job market from employed towards job facilitator through enabling environment and regulatory framework; ii) instilling attitudinal changes in local communities regarding the management of household income, moving away from consumption towards savings and investment; iii) altering local perceptions on women’s engagement in productive activities; iv) encouraging participation of structurally marginalized groups in livelihoods generating and/or investment activities; and, v) sensitizing local communities on climate-smart practices. Component 2. Promoting Enterprise Development and Livelihoods (US$37.28 million) 21. This component will support local entrepreneurs and individuals to enhance viability through the provision of matching grants, business development support, vocational training and business support facilities. In the context of prevailing socio-economic conditions in the targeted districts, interventions proposed for enterprise facilitation in this component are guided by two principles. First, support to enterprises should be extended with the objective of enhancing profitability, which implies facilitating improved productivity, higher sales and reduced costs of production. This requires product diversification to promote competition, access to new markets and adoption of climate smart technologies to ensure sustainability and mitigate the impact of climate change. Also, there is a need to recognize that skill enhancement per se will not lead to the establishment or growth of enterprises; skills trainings have to be relevant to specific sectors and contextualized, thereby leading to greater efficiency of doing business. Second, while there is potential to support rural populations in establishing new businesses, not all enterprises supported through the Project will be successful

Sector Administration & Marketing

Contact Details

Company Name Planning and Development Department, Government of Balochistan
Address Team Leader Maha Ahmed
Web Site https://projects.worldbank.org/en/projects-operations/project-detail/P159292

5.

Government of Senegal

PROMOTION AND PROTECTION OF CHILDRENS RIGHTS IN ZIGUINCHOR

  • 5,59,326
  • Senegal
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PROMOTION AND PROTECTION OF CHILDRENS RIGHTS IN ZIGUINCHOR
Company Name Government of Senegal
Country Senegal , Western Africa
Project Value 5,59,326
Project Detail

This project aims to ensure the protection of children in danger or extremely vulnerable in Ziguinchor by providing them with reception, supervision and monitoring adapted to their needs in order to ensure their social integration, their academic, professional and fulfillment. The project is divided into 4 parts. the care of children in family breakdown or isolated and their placement in family to ensure the living conditions necessary for their good development the care and educational and psychosocial support of girls (6-13 years) in early work situation who are reintegrated into the school system strengthening beneficiaries family ecosystems to guarantee their long-term security and empowerment research and capitalization on the project in order to extract good sustainable and replicable practices.

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6.

Government of Nigeria

MODERNIZE AND HARMONIZE THE NATIONAL DIGITAL IDENTIFICATION POLICY

  • 100 Million
  • Nigeria
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MODERNIZE AND HARMONIZE THE NATIONAL DIGITAL IDENTIFICATION POLICY
Company Name Government of Nigeria
Country Nigeria , Western Africa
Project Value 100 Million
Project Detail

The Identification for Development (ID4D) project aims to give more than 80% of the population of Nigeria the possibility of having a legally recognized and reliable unique digital identifier. It provides access to public (health, education, administration, ...) and private (mainly banking) services. This initiative supports the implementation of the countrys strategic roadmap to achieve universal digital identification. This objective will be achieved thanks to: the strengthening of the institutional and legal framework necessary for the implementation of the digital identity reform. This legislative framework relates to the protection of personal data, the economy and digital identification the establishment of a robust, secure digital identification system designed to respect privacy the use of services, via the digital identifier, to develop authentication or facilitate the delivery of services, in particular to the most vulnerable people. IMPACTS At the individual level, proof of legal identity will make it easier for populations to access goods and services, but also to claim their civil and political rights. The use of digital identity will secure and facilitate the administrative procedures of populations and will also strengthen the financial inclusion of the most vulnerable people. In the private sector, it will make transactions safer, which can contribute to the development of the digital economy as a whole. At the federal level, the planning and implementation of public policies will be facilitated by knowledge and identification of the population, as well as the collection of taxes and the fight against fraud.

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7.

City of Cotonou (Agla, Ménontin)

PAPC: PUT AN END TO THE FLOODS IN COTONOU

  • 40 Million
  • Nigeria
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PAPC: PUT AN END TO THE FLOODS IN COTONOU
Company Name City of Cotonou (Agla, Ménontin)
Country Nigeria , Western Africa
Project Value 40 Million
Project Detail

As part of the citys sanitation master plan, the PAPC plans to build drainage canals and retention basins throughout the city. The overall objective of the program is to make a lasting contribution to poverty reduction by improving the living conditions of the populations. The PAPC also contributes to the formulation of a long-term vision of urbanization, which maintains the delicate balance between natural constraints and social needs. AFDs contribution to the PAPC corresponds to basin XX with an area of ??524 hectares (and some extensions of canals located further upstream to complete a system already in place). Located in the western part of Cotonou, it drains the districts of Ménontin and Agla located on the edge of Lake Nokoué. Floods are frequent there, the areas to be developed are swampy and not buildable. Due to their high permeability, they contribute to the drainage of the water table. The project will be carried out in parallel with those financed by other donors (World Bank, ADB, BOAD, EIB, and IDB) and which relate to the other basins of the city. IMPACTS Basin XX will be out of water during major rainy episodes Improving the urban environment and urban mobility Improvement of the hygiene and health situation The conservation and enhancement of green areas which play the role of flood expansion and fight against heat islands Improved living conditions for around 48,000 people

Sector Administration & Marketing

Contact Details

Company Name City of Cotonou (Agla, Ménontin)
Address COTONOU Location
Web Site https://www.afd.fr/fr/carte-des-projets/papc-en-finir-avec-les-inondations-cotonou?origin=/fr/carte-des-projets?

8.

Ministry of States and Frontier Regions

Strengthening Institutions for Refugee Administration Project

  • 50 Million
  • Pakistan
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Strengthening Institutions for Refugee Administration Project
Company Name Ministry of States and Frontier Regions
Country Pakistan , Southern Asia
Project Value 50 Million
Project Detail

The Project Development Objective is to improve organizational and institutional capacity for managing refugees, and to strengthen systems for inclusive engagement of host communities in Pakistan. Key Results D. Project Description PDO Statement 5. To improve organizational and institutional capacity for managing refugees and to improve systems for inclusive engagement of host communities in Pakistan. PDO Level Indicators Progress towards the PDO will be measured by the following indicators: 1. Improving organizational and institutional capacity for management of refugees • PDO indicator 1: CCAR and CARs achieving, at least, 75 percent of assigned Key Performance Indicators. • PDO indicator 2: Registered Afghan refugee users of flexible visa facilitation centers reporting satisfaction with service standards. • PDO indicator 3: Registered Afghan refugees obtaining flexible visas (Number). 2. Improving systems for inclusive engagement of host communities • PDO Indicator 4: Host community and refugees grievances resolved through the Grievance Redress Mechanism within 45 days of reporting. • PDO indicator 5: Survey of Socio-Economic characteristics of refugees and host communities conducted and reported. B. Project Components Component 1: Improved organizational and institutional capacity for management of refugees (Performance Based) 6. This component will finance the key eligible expenditures required to achieve the results of this project. The objective of this component is to reinvigorate the results orientation of the project by supporting important milestones in the implementation of reforms related to the GoP’s program. Component 2: Technical Assistance (Traditional IPF) This component will support specific inputs required to achieve the results in the implementation of the government policy supported by this project.

Sector Administration & Marketing

Contact Details

Company Name Ministry of States and Frontier Regions
Address Team Leader Raymond Muhula, Milena Petrova Stefanova
Web Site https://projects.worldbank.org/en/projects-operations/project-detail/P165542

9.

Unité de Coordination de la Gestion des déchets solides (UCG)

Senegal Municipal Solid Waste Management Project

  • 295 Million
  • Senegal
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Senegal Municipal Solid Waste Management Project
Company Name Unité de Coordination de la Gestion des déchets solides (UCG)
Country Senegal , Western Africa
Project Value 295 Million
Project Detail

PROJECT DESCRIPTION A. Project Development Objective PDO Statement 17. The Project Development Objective (PDO) of the project is to strengthen the governance of solid waste management in Senegal and improve solid waste management services in selected municipalities. PDO Level Indicators 18. PDO-level key results indicators are the following: (a) People provided with access to improved solid waste services (Number, gender disaggregated) (Corporate Results Indicator) (b) Solid waste recycled or disposed at sanitary landfills in selected municipalities of the project (Metric tons/year) (c) Surface area of dumpsites rehabilitated (Square Meter (m2 )) (d) Municipalities with strengthened solid waste management capacity (Number) B. Project Components Component 1: Strengthening Sector Governance and Institutional Capacity (US$20.0 million equivalent, of which US$20.0 million from IDA) 19. This component aims to strengthen the institutional framework governing the sector, ensure the effectiveness of investments under Component 2, and create a favorable environment for private sector investment in the SW sector, by supporting the following: (a) Subcomponent 1a: Operationalization of the existing laws and regulations governing SWM, through ensuring (i) effective municipal and intercommunal planning for SWM, (ii) availability of financial resources for secondary waste collection,6 and (iii) an increase in local SW taxation to strengthen the sector’s self-financing capacities and sustainability. The specific areas of support will be financed through Results Based Financing (RBF) scheme, whereby funds will be disbursed to specified local or central agencies or ministries based on the achievement of specific results detailed under DLIs (see DLIs Matrix in Section VI on Results Framework and Monitoring). (b) Subcomponent 1b: TA seeking to (i) strengthen the SWM institutional framework through a range of activities, spanning from strengthening the legal and regulatory framework to capacity building for all aspects of reform and governance; (ii) promote a sustainable financing mechanism for the sector, including support for carrying out affordability and willingness-to-pay studies and creation of databases for SW fees/taxes; (iii) reinforce the PPP framework, with the standardization of key bidding documents and contracts; and (iv) enhance SW service delivery by identifying and operationalizing good practices and tailoring capacity-building activities to the selected municipalities. Component 2: Improving Solid Waste Infrastructure and Services in Selected Agglomerations (US$256.1 million equivalent, of which US$86.4 million from IDA) 20. This component will finance waste management facilities and equipment needed to establish or improve the delivery of waste management services in Greater Dakar and three secondary agglomerations, namely, Thiès, the North, and Casamance.7 Component 2 will also capitalize on synergies and experiences of the forthcoming regional program Africa Environmental Health and Pollution Management Program (P167788) financed by the Global Environment Facility, which, in Senegal, supports the development of a national strategy and plan for the treatment of and exposure to harmful chemicals and persistent organic pollutants (POPs).8 Component 2 is divided in three subcomponents, as follows: Subcomponent 2a. Improving waste management services for Greater Dakar 21. In Greater Dakar, the main challenge has been the use of Mbeubeuss dumpsite for waste disposal in the absence of a more sustainable solution for SWM. The project proposes a realistic approach for improving the condition of the Mbeubeuss dumpsite in the short, medium and long-term, with the perspective of a long-term waste treatment and disposal system to be financed under the project as a PPP/Design-Build-Finance-Operate - DBFO.9 The Government is preparing feasibility studies and bidding documents for the rehabilitation of the Mbeubeuss dumpsite,10 to be carried out in three phases: (a) The first phase (Year 1–2) will consist of implementing emergency measures to improve the site and the working conditions of waste pickers. This will include securing the site to prevent unauthorized access, adopting a code of conduct and operational measures to prevent burning of waste, and providing a health program for waste pickers.11 (b) The second phase (Year 2–4) will consist of reshaping the landfill to reclaim part of the land and covering and vegetating the waste that is already in place and stabilized. Part of the reclaimed land will be used for the construction of a sorting and composting facility. Waste remodeling is done essentially to optimize the footprint of the dumpsite and to better control and manage leachate runoff and infiltration. (c) The third and final phase (Year 5–6) will consist of permanently capping the waste at Mbeubeuss and distinguishing between presorted waste and residual waste. Only presorted waste will be allowed at the transfer and composting facilities managed by former waste pickers. Residual waste will be managed in the new long-term waste treatment and disposal system

Sector Administration & Marketing

Contact Details

Company Name Unité de Coordination de la Gestion des déchets solides (UCG)
Address Team Leader Farouk Mollah Banna, Gyongshim An
Web Site https://projects.worldbank.org/en/projects-operations/project-detail/P161477

10.

Federal Administration for Geodetic and Real-Property Affairs of the Federation of BH,

Real Estate Registration Project - Additional Financing

  • 22 Million
  • Bosnia And Herzegovina
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Real Estate Registration Project - Additional Financing
Company Name Federal Administration for Geodetic and Real-Property Affairs of the Federation of BH,
Country Bosnia And Herzegovina , Southern Europe
Project Value 22 Million
Project Detail

PROJECT DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVE Current PDO The project development objective is to support development of a sustainable real estate registration system with harmonized land register and cadastre records in urban areas of both the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Republic of Srpska. Proposed New PDO The project development objective is to support development of a sustainable real estate registration system with harmonized land registry and cadastre records in urban areas of both the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Republika Srpska.

Sector Administration & Marketing

Contact Details

Company Name Federal Administration for Geodetic and Real-Property Affairs of the Federation of BH,
Address Team Leader Camille Bourguignon-Roger
Web Site https://projects.worldbank.org/en/projects-operations/project-detail/P169463

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